March 1, 2012
"Your future in business will be defined by the people below you. A lot of the time, people spend so much time managing up that they miss everything around and beneath them. But your future will be defined by those who report to you, those who, when asked about you say , ‘My boss is excellent. I love working for them. They’re a really good leader.” That’s the best recommendation you can get. Not from someone above."

— Todd Sampson - Interview in February GQ Magazine (Aus)

9:53pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zp4zhxHJunXB
Filed under: Management 
March 1, 2012
Part of playing for high stakes under great pressure is the constant risk of mental error

February 28, 2012
David Ogilvy on Copywriting

'Before I begin, I write out a definition of the problem and a statement of the purpose which I wish the campaign to achieve. Then I go no further until the statement and its principles have been accepted by the client'

February 28, 2012

'Whenever s**t got really crazy i'd just head back to Virginia' How can you not love Dave Grohl 

1:47am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zp4zhxHAQYEm
  
Filed under: Dave Grohl 
February 27, 2012
jacobreed:

Awesome Batman/Penguin poster by Simon C Page. I believe the word you’re looking for is “Aaahh”!

jacobreed:

Awesome Batman/Penguin poster by Simon C Page. I believe the word you’re looking for is “Aaahh”!

February 12, 2012

(Source: mrzao)

January 23, 2012
Love this photo

Love this photo

January 17, 2012

(via wolf-cub)

January 17, 2012

themodernhistory:

Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre Photography - The Ruins of Detroit

Detroit, industrial capital of the XXth Century, played a fundamental role shaping the modern world. The logic that created the city also destroyed it. Nowadays, unlike anywhere else, the city’s ruins are not isolated details in the urban environment. They have become a natural component of the landscape. Detroit presents all archetypal buildings of an American city in a state of mummification. Its splendid decaying monuments are, no less than the Pyramids of Egypt, the Coliseum of Rome, or the Acropolis in Athens, remnants of the passing of a great Empire.

December 6, 2011

“Bad Light” Atherton
James Atherton always wanted the unique angle. He was willing to sacrifice the perfect environment to get the best shot. (Other photographers gave him his nickname for his apparent disregard for light.) Sometimes this got him into trouble. The above photo was not taken by Atherton but taken of Atherton. Once again trying to capture that unusual look Atherton took to the stage during a speech by President John F. Kennedy to try and capture a “Hail Mary” shot - one taken without looking through the viewfinder. When Kennedy’s press secretary saw what happened he was livid but JFK when he saw the photo in the paper, cut it out, signed it and sent it to Atherton with a note: “Two men at work.”
Atherton, who took pictures for Acme (which became part of UPI) and the Washington Post retired in 1990, after five decades which included covering every president from Truman to Nixon.
He also covered the civil rights movement. His iconic image of that period was taken on August 29, 1963 during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom which is best known for Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” Speech. Atherton attached his camera to a bamboo pole, hoisted it over the shoulder of Lincoln’s statue and took this:

Amazing what a different angle can illustrate.
Mr. Atherton was 83.
(Main image is courtesy of the Post via the Atherton Family. The second image is copyright of Atherton/UPI.)


“Bad Light” Atherton

James Atherton always wanted the unique angle. He was willing to sacrifice the perfect environment to get the best shot. (Other photographers gave him his nickname for his apparent disregard for light.) Sometimes this got him into trouble. The above photo was not taken by Atherton but taken of Atherton. Once again trying to capture that unusual look Atherton took to the stage during a speech by President John F. Kennedy to try and capture a “Hail Mary” shot - one taken without looking through the viewfinder. When Kennedy’s press secretary saw what happened he was livid but JFK when he saw the photo in the paper, cut it out, signed it and sent it to Atherton with a note: “Two men at work.”

Atherton, who took pictures for Acme (which became part of UPI) and the Washington Post retired in 1990, after five decades which included covering every president from Truman to Nixon.

He also covered the civil rights movement. His iconic image of that period was taken on August 29, 1963 during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom which is best known for Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” Speech. Atherton attached his camera to a bamboo pole, hoisted it over the shoulder of Lincoln’s statue and took this:

Amazing what a different angle can illustrate.

Mr. Atherton was 83.

(Main image is courtesy of the Post via the Atherton Family. The second image is copyright of Atherton/UPI.)

(via obitoftheday)

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